Oh the weather outside is frightful, but the fire is so delightful…that will be a tune appropriate for the Great Lakes region as we move into the mid- and end-of the week, especially toward the weekend.  A blast of cold air will be coming in Tuesday overnight and will remain over the area through the weekend.  This will kick off the chance for lake-effect snow across the Great Lakes first, then a snow system will roll into town Saturday.

Thursday

Widespread lake-effect snow will set up downwind-east of all the lakes by Thursday afternoon.  Most folks in the Great Lakes will pick up around 1-3″, with locally heavier amounts where banding sets up.

This will be a nice widespread lake-effect event – the first of its scope for the season, as the meteorological winter began December 1.  The cold air will keep its grips on the region, as a clipper system will roll into town this weekend and bring widespread snow for everyone.

Weekend system

An Alberta Clipper will dip down into the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley regions by Saturday afternoon, bringing a quick hit of 1-3″ widespread.  It will be out of the area by Sunday morning, and we will transition back over to a few isolated lake-effect snow showers by Sunday morning and into the afternoon, as cold air continues to be in place.

Temperatures

Throughout the article, colder temperatures have been referenced.  How cold?  We are talking about highs being in the upper-20s and low-30s Thursday thru Saturday.  The heart of the cold air will be Saturday with the system and into Sunday morning.  Look for lows Sunday morning to be in the teens and low-20s across the Great Lakes.

Remember when dealing with lake-effect snow that it can be sunny somewhere, then snow heavy a couple minutes down the road.  Be sure to exercise caution when driving through areas of lake-effect snow, if you will be out and about.  Slow down in general when dealing with snow and ice on the roadways, of course.  Be sure to bundle up!

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About Robert Carroll

Robert Carroll was born and raised in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Journalism from Kent State University, and is currently finishing up coursework for a Bachelor of Science degree in Geosciences/Meteorology from Mississippi State University. During his undergraduate studies, he took keen interest in winter weather and lake-effect snow – the target of his investigations and research. In his free time, Robert enjoys being outside on hiking trails, running, reading, writing, and doing yardwork.

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