After a chilly November for much of the eastern half of the country it has been very mild recently. The early December warmth won’t be lasting long as frigid Canadian air eyes the Plains, Midwest, Great Lakes and Northeast.

Get out the winter coats and make sure the shovels, ice scrapers and snow blowers are ready to go. Mother Nature will push a load of cold in and it’s not going to break down until at least the middle of the month.

If you want to get some final yard work done or put up Christmas decoration then it’s a good idea to do that Monday or early Tuesday in the East. A low pressure system will strengthen in the Midwest and bring heavy rain and very gusty winds across the eastern half of the country by later Tuesday. Strong thunderstorms are likely from eastern Oklahoma to western Illinois on Monday. Wind gusts will likely be more than 30 mph across before and after the cold front moves through.

A very strong low will track through Ontario and wrap around some snow

The cold air spreads in from west to east by Wednesday. Temperatures will be 20-30 degrees colder than the start of this week. This will allow for a widespread area of below average weather. Snow will fall fast in spots across Nebraska, The Dakotas, and northern Minnesota. Very gusty winds and a few inches of snow will cause blizzard conditions in spots across the northern Plains. Winter Weather Advisories and a Blizzard Warning is in effect.

The cold will anchor itself across the eastern half of the country for about 10 days before temperatures go closer to average. There are many signs that there warm periods will be infrequent east of the Mississippi River the rest of the month. Warm air will once again take hold across the Rockies and Southwest. This is the setup that we expected in our winter forecast.

Will It Be Snowy?

A few clipper systems will likely spread into the Great Lakes, Ohio Valley and Northeast bringing generally light accumulations. There are no major signs at potent winter storms that will bring widespread snow within the next week or two.

We are more confident on lake effect snow outbreaks downwind of the relatively warm Great Lakes. It will totally depend on the wind speeds and direction, plus available moisture to see who exactly gets the snow and how much snow belt communities could see.

Several inches of snow is likely over the next 10 days downwind of the Lakes

 

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About Brian Ivey

Brian is the President of Neoweather and has be one of the leaders of the organization since joining in 2011. Brian graduated with a bachelor’s degree in broadcast journalism from Kent State University and meteorology from Mississippi State University. Brian worked as a meteorologist and reporter in Youngstown and interned at Cleveland TV stations WKYC and WEWS. He loves Cleveland sports and enjoys going to games. You can also find him trying new spots to eat, traveling and being active outside.

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