It’s been a very busy week in the weather department. Our next storm is moving along a stationary front into the Great Lakes. Parts of southern Wisconsin, northern Illinois, Michigan, Indiana and NW Ohio will get hit hard with at least several inches.

A corridor of Winter Storm Warnings are across the area where the heavy snow will fall. Unlike the last storm we won’t have to worry about an area of ice with this storm.

A widespread swath of 8-12 inches is likely in the pink area. There will be a sharp gradient on the southern edge where the impressive snow totals cutoff. This means a quick reduction from half-foot or more totals down to just a couple of inches, It’s kind of rare to see winter storm warnings without winter weather advisories lined up a few counties around the warning. That really speaks volumes to the sharp cutoff.

The I-90 corridor from Chicago to Toledo and northward to near Ann Arbor and Detroit gets some of the higher totals and the worst impacts through the morning commute. There could certainly be some isolated areas that see more than a foot of snow.

Ohio

There won’t be much snow for most of the state. By taking a look at the major snow totals in extreme southern Michigan it’s no wonder than NW Ohio will also see some good snow. A very small area of northwest Ohio from Bryan to Toledo will see some totals around 8″ or more. Once you go east to Sandusky those numbers will drop a few clicks.

Cleveland and Ashtabula likely see snow totals closer to around 2-3″ late tonight through the morning hours. Areas south of the turnpike see only an inch or less.

More wintry mix moves in Friday evening into Saturday with another system. Then even another system pushes in by Sunday. These low pressure areas will form along a stationary front and push from the WSW to the ENE. Multiple waves of a rain/snow mix will transport across the Buckeye State. Areas of snow will lift through Michigan and eventually Ohio when a cold front drops south Sunday into Monday morning.

 

 

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About Brian Ivey

Brian is the President of Neoweather and has be one of the leaders of the organization since joining in 2011. Brian graduated with a bachelor’s degree in broadcast journalism from Kent State University and meteorology from Mississippi State University. Brian worked as a meteorologist and reporter in Youngstown and interned at Cleveland TV stations WKYC and WEWS. He loves Cleveland sports and enjoys going to games. You can also find him trying new spots to eat, traveling and being active outside.
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