The storms that moved through northern Ohio Monday night produced a destructive tornado that touched down near the border of Crawford and Richland County. The tornado touched down near North Robinson and tracked through the northern end of Crestline.

NWS Cleveland

Three injuries were reported. Part of a family was sucked out of the home where they were resting as the tornado moved through. They were tossed dozens of feet out of the house and past their swimming pool. Luckily they only had scrapes and bruises.

The tornado touched down at 10:43 p.m. and stayed on the ground for 15 miles. The National Weather Service says the tornado had estimated maximum wind speeds of 130 mph equating to a EF-2 tornado. Tornadoes are ranked on a 0-5 scale based off of the damage they cause. Tornadoes stronger than EF-1 are not very common in northern Ohio, but they certainly do happen.

Courtesy: Medina StormCast

There were other homes damaged with debris being thrown around at more than 100 mph. The storm continued moving generally westward taking out many trees and some power lines. A barn was badly damaged in a relatively rural area north of Crestline.

“There were severe thunderstorm watches and warnings, and then it just happened,” Richland County EMA Deputy Director Rick Evans told the Crawford Source. “There were no tornado warnings, and the sirens didn’t go off. It happened too quick.”

Radar shows that there was a couplet (winds moving in opposite directions close to each other). The bright blue color is wind moving northward towards the Cleveland radar site. The red color (winds moving away from the radar) is touching it just north of Crestline. This is indicative of strong rotation.

There was never a tornado warning issued for this storm, but the NWS did issue a severe thunderstorm warning with the wording “tornado possible” before the tornado ended up lifting off the ground in Richland County.

 

 

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About Brian Ivey

Brian is the President of Neoweather and has be one of the leaders of the organization since joining in 2011. Brian graduated with a bachelor’s degree in broadcast journalism from Kent State University and meteorology from Mississippi State University. Brian worked as a meteorologist and reporter in Youngstown and interned at Cleveland TV stations WKYC and WEWS. He loves Cleveland sports and enjoys going to games. You can also find him trying new spots to eat, traveling and being active outside.
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