Hurricane Harvey has reformed over the Gulf of Mexico after previously dissipating as a tropical depression.  Harvey is in a location that is currently very favorable for rapid hurricane intensification: low wind shear and warm ocean waters.  Right now,  on the current forecast track,  Harvey is expected to make landfall along the Texas coastline late Friday night or early Saturday morning.  Harvey may make landfall as a Category 2 or Category 3 hurricane.

 

Hurricane Harvey as a Category 1 Storm. Taken 5 pm EDT 8-24-17. NHC Forecast Storm track and intensity also shown.

The latest details as of 5:00 pm EDT Thursday, 8/24/17:

  • Location: 305 miles Southeast of Corpus Christi,  TX or about 300 miles South Southeast of Port O’Connor,  TX
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 85 MPH
  • Movement: North Northwest at 10 MPH
  • Minimum Central Pressure: 976 mb (28.82” Hg)

 

 

The latest NHC 3 Day Forecast for Hurricane Harvey.

 

Harvey is expected to intensify rapidly over the next 24 hours and may become a major hurricane prior to landfall (Category 3 or stronger).  If it does, it could be the first major hurricane to make landfall in the United States in over 10 years.  Along with very strong winds,  very heavy rainfall is expected with Harvey, with some locations forecast to receive 15+ inches of rainfall over the next few days.  Additionally,  storm surge flooding could exceed 9 feet in many locations along the Texas coastline.

Once Harvey moves inland,  a gradual decrease in both intensity and forward speed is expected.  Harvey may stall out over southeastern Texas through the weekend and early next week.  This will exaggerate flooding as very heavy rainfall will continue.  A storm total rainfall forecast of 15-25 inches of rain is possible through next Wednesday,  with some locations possibly receiving 35 inches of rain.

 

The WPC Rainfall Forecast for Hurricane Harvey valid through August 31,  2017. Some locations could see well over 15 inches of rainfall. Major flooding is very likely.

 

Here’s the latest storm surge forecast from the National Hurricane Center:

 

  • N Entrance Padre Island Natl Seashore to Sargent…6 to 12 ft
  • Sargent to Jamaica Beach…5 to 8 ft
  • Port Mansfield to N Entrance Padre Island Natl Seashore…5 to 7 ft
  • Jamaica Beach to High Island…2 to 4 ft
  • Mouth of the Rio Grande to Port Mansfield…2 to 4 ft
  • High Island to Morgan City…1 to 3 ft

 

 

The current Storm Surge Inundation Forecast from NOAA/NWS/NHC.

 

Watches & Warnings Currently in Effect:

  • A Hurricane Warning is in effect from Port Mansfield to Sargent,  TX
  • A Hurricane Watch is in effect from south of Port Mansfield to the mouth of the Rio Grande River
  • A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from North of Sargent,  TX to High Island,  TX
  • A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect from south of the mouth of the Rio Grande River to Boca de Catan,  Mexico
  • A Storm Surge Warning is in effect from Port Mansfield to High Island,  TX
  • A Storm Surge Watch is in effect from south of Port Mansfield to the mouth of the Rio Grande River

 

Safety Information

Those living along the Texas Coast,  especially from Corpus Christi to Galveston,  need to prepare for evacuation immediately.  Take all necessary steps to protect property as best as possible from the damaging winds and flooding.  Gather all essential items you need such as clothing, medication, food, water, your pets, and any other items you need and evacuate.  Do not wait for mandatory evacuations to be ordered!  Begin evacuating now.  It is strongly urged that you do not wait out the storm at your home.  Evacuate to a safe location well inland.

It’s also important to stay up to date on the latest information regarding Harvey and any information from public officials.  Please closely monitor local media outlets for the very latest information.

 

 

More information from the NHC:  http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/graphics_at4.shtml?cone#contents

 

 

 

 

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About Mark Spencer

Mark Spencer joined Neoweather in August of 2010 and has lived in Northeast Ohio for most of his life. Mark has played a vital role in helping Neoweather to advance and grow. Currently he serves as the Client Services Director and Assistant Financial Director for Neoweather, overseeing client relations and managing the company’s finances. Outside of Neoweather, Mark works as an Air Traffic Controller and holds an Associate’s Degree in Air Traffic Control. He enjoys being outdoors and spends as much time as he can with his son and his wife Loretta.
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