March sure came in like a lion,  but not with a winter storm or cold air,  but severe weather.

The first round of storms rolled through just before midnight in western Ohio prompting several severe thunderstorm warnings and a tornado warning for Williams County and Fulton County in northwest Ohio. A tornado watch was issued for much of western Ohio and a portion of central Ohio.

A look at the tornado warning in Fulton County as radar indicated strong rotation capable of producing a tornado 2 miles northwest of Fulton, moving east at 50 MPH.

The first cluster of storms continued to track northeast at 75 MPH,  which also promoted additional severe thunderstorm warnings for the Cleveland and Akron area around 2 a.m. The biggest threat with this first line was strong winds in excess of 60 MPH. Cleveland Hopkins Airport recorded a 61 MPH wind gust with these storms.

Round one of storms pushed through around 2 a.m.

A severe thunderstorm watch was posted for all of northeastern Ohio around 3:30 a.m. for damaging winds and large hail. The second line of storms entered Ohio around 3:30 a.m. with several tornado warnings and severe thunderstorm warnings.

Round two enters Ohio and tracks east.

As the line continued to progress east,  a tornado warning was issued for Cuyahoga County,  Geauga County,  Medina County and Summit County shortly after 5:30 a.m. Radar indicated several notches of rotation near Richfield,  Twinsburg,  Oakwood and Solon. Radar also indicated two spots of broad and weak rotation one in Akron and Coventry and in Sugar  Bush Knolls,  Kent and Brady Lake.

A tornado warning was issued for several counties shortly after 5:30 a.m.

As the storms continued east towards the state line,  additional severe thunderstorm warnings were issued,  but the rotation
that prompted tornado warnings in the Cleveland and Akron metro within the line weakened.

Lots of damage has been reported especially in western Ohio and areas that saw the tornado warning in eastern Ohio. In Lima,  Ohio trees came down and many were without power. The same goes for portions of Summit County as Cuyahoga Falls and Stow reported many large trees down.

In Hamilton County,  reports of roofs blown off homes along with multiple trees down.

Trees came down in Stow from the strong winds during the early morning hours.

Tornado warnings are rare in late February or early March in Ohio, but they are not uncommon. The last time Cuyahoga County (Cleveland) was under a tornado warning was July 2014. These storms were fueled in an unstable air mass as much of Ohio reached the 60s on Tuesday and will again Wednesday ahead of a sharp cold front. Temperatures are expected to drop back into the 30s for Thursday.

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