Severe weather continues across the south this morning with a line of severe weather across parts of Alabama and the Florida panhandle.  A new Tornado Watch is now in effect until 1 pm CDT for southern Alabama and most of the Florida panhandle.  Severe storms will continue to move eastward into Georgia and the Carolinas this afternoon and evening.

The Storm Prediction Center has an enhanced risk for severe weather across southern Alabama, the western panhandle of Florida and parts of central Georgia.  Surrounding this is a slight risk for severe weather that extends to Charlotte,  NC and Charleston,  SC.  Damaging winds will be the primary threat from these storms however,  a few tornadoes are also possible.  Large hail is also possible but will only be found with the stronger storm cells.  There is also a lot of moisture associated with these storms and flooding will also be very possible.

 

The Latest Convective Outlook from the Storm Prediction Center in Norman,  OK.

 

 

Models show a line of storms moving across the region into this evening,  reaching the east coast by midnight EDT.  A couple of models also hint at a few storms developing ahead of the line of storms across parts of Georgia,  South Carolina,  and North Carolina.  If storms do develop ahead of the line,  these storms will be capable of producing large hail and perhaps a few tornadoes.  Below is a loop of one of our high resolution models running from 8 AM EDT through midnight EDT.

 

 

 

Our exclusive NeoRisk shows the biggest threats being damaging winds and flooding across the region through tonight.  A few tornadoes are possible and large hail is possible with any storms that develop ahead of the current line of storms or with any of the stronger storms embedded within the line itself. The timing of the storms will vary from west to east as the storms continue moving to the east through the day.  Expect the line of storms to reach Atlanta,  GA by early afternoon.

 

 

Our exclusive NeoRisk for the Southeast US today.

 

 

Weather conditions will change rapidly through the morning and afternoon hours.  Be sure to stay alert to changing weather conditions and monitor local media outlets and NOAA Weather Radio for updates.  Be prepared to seek shelter before the storms impact your area. While a tornado outbreak is NOT LIKELY TO OCCUR,  you will still want to take steps to prepare for the storms in advance as they may cause power outages in many areas and the power could be out for several hours to a couple of days while crews make repairs.  Storms will begin to diminish as they approach the east coast tonight.  Once the sun goes down,  the storms should begin to dissipate with the loss of daytime heating.

Be sure to stay with Neoweather for updates.  We’ll post updates throughout the day on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.

 

 

 

mm

About Mark Spencer

Mark Spencer joined Neoweather in August of 2010 and has lived in Northeast Ohio for most of his life. Mark has played a vital role in helping Neoweather to advance and grow. Currently he serves as the Client Services Director and Assistant Financial Director for Neoweather, overseeing client relations and managing the company’s finances. Outside of Neoweather, Mark works as an Air Traffic Controller and holds an Associate’s Degree in Air Traffic Control. He enjoys being outdoors and spends as much time as he can with his son and his wife Loretta.
TOP