Cool weather has arrived once again. May was wet across northern Ohio and southern Michigan. It was also on the cool side across the two states. Now we are almost a week into June and we have generally seen some warm summer weather with 70s and 80s stretching all the way into the U.P. of Michigan.

The warm weather is not the case anymore. A big trough of low pressure is developing across the eastern half of the country with a ridge of high pressure in the west. This is making the temperatures favor below average in the east and above average in the west. Eventually The Great Lakes and Ohio Valley will tap into the warmer weather, but it won’t be in the near future.

Warm in the west due to a ridge of high pressure, but cool east

Temperatures in the 60s and low 70s arrived for the day today with only the southern half of Ohio seeing summertime weather in the 80s. A cold front will sweep further south and bring even cooler weather tonight and Tuesday. Low temperatures will drop into the low to mid 50s for much of the area. High temperatures will definitely have a chill feeling for June. Low to mid 60s will be a common number for many in the Mitten and Buckeye State. Maybe Dayton and Cincinnati can rise into the 70s.

There will be a few cool days this week, but this weekend the trough will start to breakdown and the jet stream will shift northward. This will allow for us to tap into the warm air from the west and southwest meaning temperatures soaring back into the 80s. Below is a look at the computer forecast from the European Model for Detroit. After a few days in the 60s and 70s we will climb into the mid 80s by the end of the weekend and start of next week. This means an above average pattern for the middle of the month.

Long range models project anywhere from the upper 70s to the upper 80s going through mid month. This should mean near average to warmer than average weather.

There will also be less rain in the forecast for much of this week due to the lack of Gulf Coast moisture and ingredients to form thunderstorms. The best rain chances will be to the east and south of the Ohio Valley.

About Brian Ivey

Brian is the President of Neoweather and has be one of the leaders of the organization since joining in 2011. He loves helping Neoweather grow with excellent customer service and positive impacts to the operations of all clients. Brian graduated with degrees in broadcast journalism and meteorology. Brian worked as a meteorologist in Youngstown, Steubenville and beyond. He loves Cleveland sports and enjoys going to games. You can also find him trying new spots to eat, traveling and being active outside.
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